War Never Changes

an original fallout rp established in 2012 | player driven, world building | no word count, no character limit, includes Fallout 1 - 4

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CELEBRATING GREAT WAR DAY! Attention, dwellers, the vault-door is officially open to the wasteland. It's a brave new world, let's make the best of it! Welcome to "War Never Changes," we hope you survive your stay.

Vault Maintenance It's been a long time that we've been locked inside this vault, so please have patience as we sort out any kinks with the system. If you see something that needs attention, please let an Overseer know.

10.23 "War Never Changes" DLC launches. Public reopening begins.

09.30 After 4 good years, the story concludes. Fallout 66 ends.

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War... war never changes. It began with the bombing of the old world. Nuclear fire destroyed much of the American Commonwealth, and what survived did so by adjusting to the wasteland left in war's wake. 200 years later, out of the development of the Boneyard, the Will Roger Caravan Company took up the challenge to establish the Route 66 highway as a caravan trade route, stretching from NCR controlled California to the Brotherhood of Steel in Chicago, Illinois. Their progress met its end in St. Louis, "Missury," where a year-long campaign ended in another nuclear detonation to the city.

Months after the blast, survivors and drifters alike creep back into the ruins of the old world wreck. The shattered remains of establishments shake off the Fallout and carry on. The bones of St. Louis stir again with life...

October-December, 2299

The temperature is dropping, but it's nothing like the blizzard of 2298. Proper shelter at night is becoming non-negotiable. Drifters must either pool their resources to afford a homestead or they must rent from one of the few establishments remaining.

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 The Sixty-sixers
VAULT-TEC
 Posted: Dec 2 2013, 12:35 PM
QUOTE
--- years
Moderator race
Vault-Tec
Lawful Good
biography by FALLOUT 66 STAFF

SKILLS

N/A N/A N/A N/A

PERKS

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Strength
10/10
Perception
10/10
Endurance
10/10
Charisma
10/10
Intelligence
10/10
Agility
10/10
Luck
10/10

WEAPONS

N/A

N/A

N/A

COMPANION

N/A
Message
Plotter
Inventory
Development
Wallet
Caps: 852
Adventures
392
Text
N/A


how the far-flung boys dominated the 66 The Far-Flung Boys were a motorized band of highway-pirates founded by brothers Diesel and Deadbolt. Growing up in a small shanty-town along the western border of Oklahoma, just off from Clinton, the two boys were raised wild and free, fed off the freedom of the open highway and the legend of the historic Route 66.

Both boys developed a notorious reputation early on in their lives. Their intimidation through violence and brutality garnered many impressionable and like-minded allies, and the brothers had a posse formed before they hit their adolescent years. The brothers used those following under their leadership to help them obtain territory within their home district against opposing raider gangs.

With the old Route 66 highway cutting through rival grounds, turf warfare was a daily affair. Strength in a group was something estimated by the amount of road a particular posse held under their control. The highway was a map broken up into different districts of control under different gangs, but where the brothers encountered division and borders they instead envisioned freedom and unity.

Conflicts over territory were wild and bloody, but it wouldn't be until 2289 that the violent assaults would begin a whole new level of brutality. In the plains commonwealth, bands of raiders are thick and many. Competition for turf is normalcy. A change began, however, when a new gang calling themselves the Broken Horns emerged from out west in 2289. Following Route 66 across Texas and into Oklahoma, the Broken Horns knew that unorganized and divided raider groups were weaker targets to conquer. The Broken Horns swiftly gained the upper hand in numbers and strength through strategic destruction and assimilation of beaten gangs. There was a disciplined, militaristic efficiency in their domination and absorption of other groups that the highway raiders had never seen before.

In order to hope to stand against this new opponent, Diesel and Deadbolt resorted to creating an alliance - a concept before unheard of - with a handful of neighboring raider tribes. Tribes that had previously been their rivals for territory. In the wake of the growing threat of the Broken Horns, it was a mutually beneficial relationship for all involved. The swell in size gave the newly formed group strength to resist becoming the next immediate target. With these combined strips of the 66 being the farthest stretch ever controlled by one highway gang in the Oklahoma state, the new group took to calling themselves the Far-Flung Boys. The Far-Flung Boys were able to withstand direct assault by the Broken Horns for a while, but day-by-day their numbers were struck at by their adversary.

The turning point in the conflict hit a crescendo when the Broken Horns, having garnered enough men to no longer hesitate against the Far-Flung Boys, began a full-scale assault. It would be only by Deadbolt's sheer luck, and Diesel's ingenuity, that the Far-Flung Boys would be saved from inevitable defeat.

In the ensuing crossfire of the attack, younger brother Deadbolt was separated from the rest of the Far-Flungs. Forced to seek shelter within what appeared to be an abandoned car garage, he stumbled upon a discovery. Inside the building he found a lonely hermit living among fully functional, albeit rusted down and shoddy looking, motorcars and motorcycles. Deadbolt, seeing treasure amid this prewar trash, and an edge against the Broken Horns, would apprehend the hermit - later identified as Piston Pete. After the savage conflict, Deadbolt would bring the reclusive grease-monkey back to his elder brother and the badly battered Far-Flung Boys. After Diesel heard of Deadbolt's findings, the elder brother forced Piston Pete into showing them the bikes and teaching the Far-Flung Boys how to operate the vehicles. To the brothers, the motorbikes were presented as the desperately needed advantage to beat back the Broken Horns.

With Diesel and Deadbolt's surviving members saddled on their new motorized steeds, the brothers prepared for the next inevitable assault that would finish them. Defiant to the last, and damned to go down without hell to pay, the Far-Flungs rode out to every raider tribe that would listen and receive them. The gangs that listened, they rallied beneath their banner. The brothers rode tirelessly, day and night. By the time the Broken Horns began a second full-scale battle, the Far-Flung Boys were ready for it.

With no time to spare, the Far Flungs had resorted to utilizing highway signs and broken down parts of vehicles to armor themselves and their newly claimed mounts. It was patch-work and unlike anything the raider tribes had worn before, but it rallied them with a sense of unity. As the largest conglomerate of highway men to ever align under one cause, they rode to meet their opponent in 2290. What greeted the arrival of The Broken Horns was a motorized cavalry, welded with the brand of the fabled Route 66.

The western conquerers, having never before experienced a vehicular attack, were stunned. The warlords choked. It was bloody and terrifying battle, but in the end the Broken Horns were beaten back. Deadbolt and a contingent of riders rode out to run down the retreating army. Over the expanse of the following month, the Far-Flung Boys hunted down any survivors of the Broken Horns tribe in order to set an example to all others who would oppose. Their new vehicles gave them unparalleled swiftness of travel, and the Broken Horns did not get very far.

For the Far-Flung Boys, their enemy was defeated - but they had learned much from the harrowing encounter. Utilizing the organization their enemy had displayed, the motorized marauders rode out in tight formations to secure their highway. The riders also adopted the system of assimilation of other tribes into their own. After experiencing the efficiency of this system by their defeated enemy, as well as how their treaties proved to be the salvation of their people, the Far-Flungs maintained this practice to both bolster their numbers and quash any would-be rivals.

Many other groups and settlements joined willingly into the Far-Flungs' numbers. Awed or inspired by the riders' demonstration of strength, tenacity, and the protection they offered, soon the remainder of the 66 was beneath their banner. With a colorful array of groups now assimilated as one faction, the highway men found themselves a varied and diverse people. They adopted tales of Route 66 as their religion-like beliefs and motorized vehicles as the closest things to homes they would own. As such, freedom riding was the foundation of their tribe - no gods, no masters, no roots. Law and order and fences became the vision of the enemy.

Two months after the defeat of the Broken Horns in 2290 and the Far-Flung Boys would become the undisputed power riding up and down the old 66 mother road. Decked out in highway signs and Route 66 themed armor, the title "Sixty-Sixers" began to circulate, and the two brothers decided to keep it. The name became synonymous with the faction and the territory they branded as their own.

The Sixty-Sixers patrolled east and west along the old highway, riding as clear and free as the ancient tales of riders and sight-seeing travelers the prewar world told of. Like the ancient biker gangs of old, the Sixty-Sixers took care of their own and minded no law. As long as trespassers in their territory stayed clear of the highway and their path, the riders generally kept to the road and seldom ventured beyond it. The Sixty-Sixers would expand as far east as the Mississippi River, not yet daring to cross into Brotherhood of Steel patrolled Illinois, and as far west as New Mexico, where they clashed against the slaver-soldiers of Caesar's Legion. Fearing that either side should inevitably attempt to encroach onto their territory, the Sixers took to fiercely patrolling their strip of highway - and eventually established their main base of operations in the historic Union Station of St. Louis, Missouri, in the year 2293.

In order to maintain their domineering presence, the Sixty-Sixers salvaged any and all vehicles they came across. To equip their faction with wheels, and keep what they had operational, shop maintenance was necessary. It would be Piston Pete that would teach the riders how to restore these machines back into working condition.

With their place on the highway secure, Diesel would install a ban from any raiding assaults on traders and merchants. The Sixty-Sixers would begin to openly barter and trade heavily for much-desired fuel cells. Diesel would see trade along the 66 as a boon to the Sixers, despite Deadbolt's misgivings that it would only encourage settlers and lessen the fear the riders used to control the highway. The faction, however, carried on as Diesel had instructed - until the arrival of the Will Roger Caravan Company into Kansas.

With trading caravans and merchant travelers able to pass through Sixer territory unmolested, daring scatterings of people made humble dwellings along the roadway, far enough off the strip of highway to avoid being a target. When the Will Roger trading company took up Project Mother Road, looking to establish Route 66 as a solid and unchallenged stretch of trade from one end of the highway to the other - settlers began to feel bolstered. Every trading post the WRCC would make along the highway would sprout homes and fledgling communities. Soon fences and governing bodies blossomed in these newly constructed settlements. The WRCC would breach into Sixty-Sixer territory in the year 2295. As each community following the company grew, the stronger the settlers grew with them - and if the biker gang presented itself as a threat, the settlers rallied against them.

As a trading group, the WRCC and the Sixty-Sixers enacted an agreement of safe passage for fair trade. The terms would allow for the WRCC to travel through the raiders' turf so long as the company provided fuel cells for the gang's demand. But as had been done along the 66, with each trade stop erected settlers began to establish new communities. As these stops grew, the riders began to find their territory diminishing. Lands that had been open and free were becoming fenced and gated. Where bikers had before been able to travel wherever they pleased, now their presence was contested by settlements. By the end of 2297, the WRCC would move as far east as Kansas. It was at this point that the leadership in the Sixty-Sixers would take a violent turn.

It was Deadbolt who called the conference. In one of the relatively abandoned wings of the sprawling Union Station, the two brothers met in private counsel. The events that transpired within are relatively unknown, save for what could be plainly evidenced. In the end, Diesel was murdered. He'd been bludgeoned to death by a tire iron.

Suddenly the only leader in what had always been a previously co-founded faction, Deadbolt brought immediate change to the gang. He instantly abolished the restrictions on caravan assaults. The attacks would become as unpredictable as the man now leading the Sixty-Sixers. Traders found that by carrying generous supplies of fuel cells, or traveling with mechanics, the riders were noticeably more tolerant of their presence, but travel had changed. What had become complacent expansion and settlement was now uncertain risk and unpredictable attacks.

With the old brutality reawakened, the fear once associated with the name "Sixty-Sixers" sparked back to life. The faction's dominance over Route 66 once again became their primary objective, even so much as spurring the highway men to begin scouting east of the Mississippi River and bringing a halt in the expansion of the caravans and settlements by the year 2298.

^
VAULT-TEC
 Posted: Jun 3 2016, 10:20 PM
QUOTE
--- years
Moderator race
Vault-Tec
Lawful Good
biography by FALLOUT 66 STAFF

SKILLS

N/A N/A N/A N/A

PERKS

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Strength
10/10
Perception
10/10
Endurance
10/10
Charisma
10/10
Intelligence
10/10
Agility
10/10
Luck
10/10

WEAPONS

N/A

N/A

N/A

COMPANION

N/A
Message
Plotter
Inventory
Development
Wallet
Caps: 852
Adventures
392
Text
N/A


the mechanical hermit, Piston Pete Peter was always a strange fellow, even as a small child. He shied away from human contact and interaction and preferred the quiet company of gadgets, gears, and gizmos. His parents were good-natured people and allowed their son to spend his days disassembling and reassembling anything from a lawn mower to a motorbike. His family owned their own general goods store just a stone's throw from Clinton, Oklahoma, and so Peter's life was afforded the comfort necessary to allow him this all-consuming hobby. A hobby that became more of an obsession for him in later years.

As Peter, nick-named "Piston" Pete by family and friends, grew into young adulthood, his folks began to have less patience for his reclusive behavior. They began coaxing him into mercantile work such as they themselves did. They tried to encourage their twelve-year-old son to help around the shop, even handle sales, but the more they pushed the more Pete withdrew himself into tinkering.

On a bright summer's day, Pete's escapism would become his only reality when the boy stumbled upon an old automobile repair shop, Sam & Dean's Auto Hub. Using his gifted touch, the boy had the padlocked doors opened before long and found himself lost in a paradise of motor-vehicles. Corvega, Chryslus, Pick-R-Up, Lone Wanderer, coupes, vans, bikes and trucks - the shop had it all, and the wasteland was riddled with even more. Pete would never return home, and his parents would always assume their son was killed while wandering out away from their home.

Pete would remain with his new "family" in the old car garage, his only interactions with the outside world being rare trades done with travelers for whatever goods or foods he could not find on his own. The boy would grow into a man, and his reputation for repair and mechanical skill would earn him back the name Piston Pete. Pete would begin to make a humble living off his skills.

As the years rolled by into decades, more and more dangerous sorts would begin to move into the small pocket of peace he had known as a child. Piston Pete's involvement with humanity would draw to another close when a band of raiders staged an attempt to break into his garage in order to steal the pile of caps they believed the man had hoarded away inside. Little did they know that Pete spent most of his earnings on parts and equipment for repairs and maintenance. The break-in would bring about the first display of violence that Pete ever demonstrated in his lifetime. To everyone's shock and surprise, Piston Pete killed every last raider attempting to break into his home and threaten his "family". From that incident on, Pete would continue to live on as an isolated hermit that the settlers would know to keep clear of.

Piston Pete would eventually become a local legend, though the man would remain unaware of it. The locals would warn that the old repair shop was a haunted place, and the strange noises sometimes heard inside would encourage people to stay away. The local's aversion to the garage wouldn't matter for much longer. As raider territory expanded and their violence grew, the community around Pete cleared out and the reclusive mechanic was left behind, alone save for the company of his cars and motorbikes.

The next time Pete would have any contact with the outside world, he'd be a grey-haired old man. His sudden and unwanted re-immersion into society would be at the hands of raiders. Deadbolt, co-founder of the Far-Flung Boys,would stumble his way upon what the raider would first assume to be an empty prewar garage. Instead, the Far-Flung Boy came upon Pete and his store of vehicles and equipment. Pete, caught off-guard by the sudden arrival of the stranger, would be taken forcefully from his shop and brought to the nest of Deadbolt's posse. Piston Pete, his motorcycles, and his know-how would ultimately save not only his life, but ironically the lives of the gang he had been captured by.

Pete would single-handedly motorize the Far-Flung Boys, his mechanical skills helping to win their war against rival tribes. The Far-Flung Boys, later to be known as the Sixty-Sixers, would forever regard Pete as one of their own. Pete would soon find himself surprisingly comfortable among the motor-gang. Within their headquarters in St. Louis, he'd even come to be held as some sort of vehicular prophet. Highly regarded, and mostly left alone to tinker with the vehicles, Pete willingly stayed among the faction.

Piston Pete would meet his final end on a salvaging mission, riding along with the Sixty-Sixers. An old bike shop on the eastern-most border of New Mexico had been reported by highway scouts. In the attempt to sneak in and ransack the vehicles inside the shop, the Sixty-Sixers clashed with a border patrol of Caesar's Legion. Both sides laid utter waste to the other, and Piston Pete was killed in the conflict. His mechanical skills are survived only by the gear-headed grease-bandits he had allowed to apprentice under him.

^
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